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Midterms and Healthcare – Three Things You Need To Know

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Less than a week away from the mid-term elections our CEO, Scott Olson, shares 3 topics to consider regarding healthcare.

1. How crucial it is to ensure that mental health and addiction is covered by insurance.

Historically, the coverage has been very bad, until the ACA mandated coverage – this combined with Parity has helped many people. Healthcare affordability is an extremely important item for every American. Statistically, 62% of Americans file bankruptcy due to medical bills. In the midst of a national opioid epidemic, it is important mental health and addiction treatment remains covered. Most healthcare professionals will agree that the ACA needs to be altered, but the question is how to make these changes successfully and that will not be an easy process.

2. The risk of granting money to states without direction.

While I agree state autonomy is good, it is also scary when it comes to addiction because most states are not equipped to put money to good, beneficial use. Many times, this is because they have no good options, which is why there has been an overwhelming gap in treatment.
For the past 50 years, evidence has shown us the best practices for treating the chronic disease of addiction (and support from NIH, the Surgeon General and the Secretary of Health and Human Services) yet many states are still not properly educated or settled on treatment protocols. This leads to confusion, bias, indecision, and misplacement of grant money that could be better conducted to produce a more efficient access to care and effective means of treatment.

3. Also, we need to better figure out how to work with big companies like Amazon and JPMorgan and Berkshire who have said they are working on healthcare.

When big companies decide to get behind needs like health care, the good news is, they can do big things. There is a way for all of us to work together to improve the healthcare system. If healthcare executives, businesses, government, insurance companies, and others could come together and embrace the task at hand we could make some major improvements. It would be hard work, but anything worth anything usually is in the beginning.